Shrimp

Shrimp are swimming crustaceans with long narrow muscular abdomens and long antennae. Unlike crabs and lobsters, shrimp have well developed pleopods (swimmerets) and slender walking legs; they are more adapted for swimming than walking. Members of the Natantia (shrimp in the broader sense) were adapted for swimming while the Reptantia (crabs, lobsters, etc.) were adapted for crawling or walking. Some other groups also have common names that include the word “shrimp”; any small swimming crustacean resembling a shrimp tends to be called one. The sketch is  direct to watercolor without ink. Holbein and Daniel Smith watercolors in a Stillman and Birn sketchbook.

2016-02-23-Shrimp

Ghost Crab

 

Ghost crabs are semi-terrestrial crabs of the subfamily Ocypodinae. They are common shore crabs in tropical and sub-tropical regions throughout the world, inhabiting deep burrows in the intertidal zone. They are generalist scavengers and predators of small animals. The name “ghost crab” derives from their nocturnality and their generally pale coloration. They are also sometimes called sand crabs. Characteristics of the subfamily include one claw being larger than the other, thick and elongated eyestalks, and a box-like body. The sketch is  direct to watercolor without ink. Holbein and Daniel Smith watercolors in a Stillman and Birn sketchbook.

2016-02-22-Ghost Crab

Queen Triggerfish

The queen triggerfish reaches 24 in, though most only are about half that length. It is typically blue, purple, turquoise and green with a yellowish throat, and light blue lines on the fins and head. It can change colour somewhat to match its surroundings, or if subjected to stress. In the western Atlantic, it ranges from Canada to southern Brazil, and is reasonably common in Florida, the Bahamas and the Caribbean. The queen triggerfish is typically found at coral and rocky reefs in depths of 10–100 feet, but it can occur as deep as 900 feet and sometimes over areas with sand or sea grass. The sketch is  direct to watercolor without ink. Holbein and Daniel Smith watercolors in a Stillman and Birn sketchbook.

2016-02-20-Queen Triggerfish