Orient Point Lighthouse

A wonderful ferry trip across Long Island Sound from New London, Connecticut to Orient Point, New York. This is a view of the Orient Point Lighthouse as you approach the harbor at the far Eastern end of Long Island.  The lighthouse is located on a reef just below the water. The deep and narrow gap between Orient Point and Plum Island is called Plum Gut, and at ebb tide, the waters of Long Island Sound rush through at currents exceeding 5 knots, creating a churning mix of white-capped waves and dangerous riptides that is a challenge for even the most experienced mariners. Oyster Pond Reef, a dangerous obstacle lying just beneath the surface of the water extends from Orient Point one third of the way across Plum Gut, making the passage even more treacherous. Pilot Falcon fountain pen with Noodler’s black ink and Holbein watercolors in a Stillman and Birn sketchbook.

2016-02-29 Orient Point Lighthouse

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Bait and Tackle

Another stop as we were walking around Greenport, NY. A tiny structure that was a Bait and Tackle shop that is now Little Creek Oyster Bar. This is located on the harbor in Greenport. It was a beautiful, cold, sunny day after a week of strong winds. Pilot Falcon fountain pen with Noodler’s black ink and Holbein watercolors in a Stillman and Birn sketchbook.

2016-02-28 Bait Tackle

Celebration of George

Today we reunited with friends to attend a Celebration of Life for one of our dear professors of architecture at Oklahoma State University. Professor George Baumiller was 97 years old and an amazing person, teacher and friend. The celebration was at his home and studio in Greenport, Long Island, New York. The home was filled with wonderful family, friends, students and neighbors that were all touched by George. This is a sketch of the front of his home with the trellis on the front of the house. He loved the roses that grew on this trellis and paper flowers were hung on the vines as a remembrance. Pilot Falcon fountain pen with Noodler’s black ink and Holbein watercolors in a Stillman and Birn Beta sketchbook.

2016-02-27 Georges House

Hermit Crab

The hermit crab is a type of crab that does no have a very hard shell. Not actually a true crab, it uses other animals’ old shells for protection; they especially like whelk shells. As a hermit crab grows in size, it must continue to find larger shells. There are about 500 species of hermit crabs found throughout the world. Most hermit crabs live on the ocean floor, but many can live on land. The sketch is  direct to watercolor without ink. Holbein and Daniel Smith watercolors in a Stillman and Birn sketchbook.

2016-02-25 Hermit Crab

Sally Lightfoot Crab

The Sally Lightfoot crab, sometimes called the red rock crab, is a common sight on rocky beaches on the Atlantic and Pacific coastlines of the Americas, from Florida down to Brazil.  Adults, which have carapace widths of around 5-8 centimeters, are generally bright red, brown, or orange with various patterns, while young Sally Lightfoot crabs are darker-colored. Sally Lightfoot crabs spend most of their time hiding away in rock crevices, but when they come out to feed they move with the remarkable agility and speed that give them their common name. While they feed, powerful waves often crash over them, but they are able to withstand these by flattening themselves against rocks and holding on tightly. Although these crabs mainly eat red and green algae, they will eat practically anything they can get, including mussels, barnacles, other crabs, young sea turtles, dead fish. The sketch is  direct to watercolor without ink. Holbein and Daniel Smith watercolors in a Stillman and Birn sketchbook.

2016-02-24 Sally Lightfoot Crab

Shrimp

Shrimp are swimming crustaceans with long narrow muscular abdomens and long antennae. Unlike crabs and lobsters, shrimp have well developed pleopods (swimmerets) and slender walking legs; they are more adapted for swimming than walking. Members of the Natantia (shrimp in the broader sense) were adapted for swimming while the Reptantia (crabs, lobsters, etc.) were adapted for crawling or walking. Some other groups also have common names that include the word “shrimp”; any small swimming crustacean resembling a shrimp tends to be called one. The sketch is  direct to watercolor without ink. Holbein and Daniel Smith watercolors in a Stillman and Birn sketchbook.

2016-02-23-Shrimp

Ghost Crab

 

Ghost crabs are semi-terrestrial crabs of the subfamily Ocypodinae. They are common shore crabs in tropical and sub-tropical regions throughout the world, inhabiting deep burrows in the intertidal zone. They are generalist scavengers and predators of small animals. The name “ghost crab” derives from their nocturnality and their generally pale coloration. They are also sometimes called sand crabs. Characteristics of the subfamily include one claw being larger than the other, thick and elongated eyestalks, and a box-like body. The sketch is  direct to watercolor without ink. Holbein and Daniel Smith watercolors in a Stillman and Birn sketchbook.

2016-02-22-Ghost Crab