Holly

With the last of the fall leaves, comes the change of season over to winter and the thoughts of Christmas. We have 6-8 natural Holly Trees in our yard that were here when we built our house. The largest is probably 30′ tall. This one must be a male in that it does not produce berries. Pilot Falcon fountain pen with Noodler’s Bulletproof black ink, Holbein watercolors and a background wash of Mont Blanc black ink.

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Flowering Pear Leaves

Our last tree to realize that it is Autumn. The leaves on the Flowering Pear Tree are just turning now after almost all of the other trees have lost their leaves and are ready for winter. These leaves still have some of the of the green and are turning yellow with some red highlights. Holbein watercolors in a Stillman and Birn Beta sketchbook.

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Sun Angles

I was having a discussion with a colleague last night and he was saying that the sun is never north of the East West line. Going back to what I learned in school using a sun angle calculator (now it is even easier on the internet) I sketched this diagram showing the position of the sun at sunrise and sunset in at the summer and winter solstice. Pilot Falcon fountain pen with Noodler’s Bulletproof black ink and Holbein watercolors in a Stillman and Birn sketchbook.

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Falmouth Harbor

A beautiful Autumn Sunday afternoon in Falmouth, Massachusetts on Cape Cod. While Lisa walked Falmouth Heights, I sat in the car and sketched Falmouth Harbor. Still some boats left before they all get stored out of the water for the winter. Lamy fountain pen with Noodler’s Bulletproof black ink and Holbein watercolors in a Moleskine landscape watercolor sketchbook.

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Nauset Light

Nauset Light was constructed in 1877 and was originally one of two lights in Chatham It was moved to Eastham in 1923 to replace the Three Sisters of Nauset, three small wood lighthouses that had been decommissioned. Nauset Light was originally all white, but in the 1940s was painted with the red section at the top, creating the iconic appearance of the lighthouse. The light was automated and the keeper’s house was sold in 1955. Due to coastal erosion, by the early 1990s Nauset Light was less than 50 feet from the edge of the 70-foot cliff on which it stood. In 1993, the Coast Guard proposed decommissioning the light. Following a great public outcry, the non-profit Nauset Light Preservation Society was formed and funded, and in 1995, it leased the lighthouse from the Coast Guard. The organization arranged for the light to be relocated, in November 1996, to a location 336 feet west of its original position – which by then was only 37 feet  from the cliff’s edge. Pilot Falcon fountain pen with Noodler’s Bulletproof black ink and Holbein watercolors in a Stillman and Birn Beta sketchbook.

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